A History Of The B-24 Liberator in Over 500 Photographs, Stories And Analyisis: Including The U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II: Combat Chronology 1941 - 1945 - American Air Power in WWII U.S. Department of Defense

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Published: July 28th 2015

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A History Of The B-24 Liberator in Over 500 Photographs, Stories And Analyisis: Including The U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II: Combat Chronology 1941 - 1945 - American Air Power in WWII  by  U.S. Department of Defense

A History Of The B-24 Liberator in Over 500 Photographs, Stories And Analyisis: Including The U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II: Combat Chronology 1941 - 1945 - American Air Power in WWII by U.S. Department of Defense
July 28th 2015 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | | ISBN: | 7.33 Mb

Over 1,600 total pages!PREFACEThe chronology is concerned primarily with operations of the US Army AirForces and its combat units between December 7, 1941 and September 15, 1945. It isdesigned as a companion reference to the seven-volume historyMoreOver 1,600 total pages!PREFACEThe chronology is concerned primarily with operations of the US Army AirForces and its combat units between December 7, 1941 and September 15, 1945.

It isdesigned as a companion reference to the seven-volume history of The Army AirForces in World War 11, edited by Wesley Frank Craven and James Lea Cate. Theresearch was a cooperative endeavor carried out in the United States Air Forcehistorical archives by the Research Branch of the Albert F. Simpson HistoricalResearch Center.Such an effort has demanded certain changes in established historicalmethodology, as well as some arbitrary rules for presentation of the results.

AfterInternational and US events, entries are arranged geographically. They begin withevents at Army Air Forces Headquarters in Washington then proceed eastward aroundthe world, using the location of the headquarters of the numbered air forces as thebasis for placement.

For this reason, entries concerning the Ninth Air Force whileoperating in the Middle East follow Twelfth Air Force. When that headquarters movesto England in October 1943, the entries are shifted to follow Eighth Air Force. Theentries end with those numbered air forces which remained in the Zone of the Interior,as well as units originally activated in the ZI, then designated for later movementoverseas, such as Ninth and Tenth Air Forces.

The ZI entries do not include Eighthand Twentieth Air Forces, which were established in the ZI with the original intent ofplacing them in those geographical locations with which they became historicallyidentified. For these two units, original actions are shown either under AAF or in theirintended geographic area of location.All times and dates used are those of the area under discussion.

The entry 1/2Jun indicates that an event occurred during the night between the two given dates,while 1-2 Jun indicates an action over a period of time.In dealing with people, again arbitrary decisions were implemented. For militarymen below the general officer or equivalent level, full grade and name were used. Forgeneral officers and those of equal grade in other US and foreign services, thecomplete rank (both that at the time first mentioned and the highest rank held prior tothe end of the war) and name will be found in the index.

Only an abbreviated rank(e.g., Gen or Adm) and last name are used in the text. The exception is where twogeneral officers had the same last name- in such cases, the first name is also included.Similarly for civilian leaders, only the last name is used- full name and title are givenin the index.Location of all towns, islands, etc., is also made in the index. In all cases, attemptswere made to cite place names in use by the native population at the time of orimmediately before the war.

No names imposed by a conqueror are used. For examplePylos Bay, not Navarino Bay, is used. Further, as appropriate, native geographic termsare used: Shima for island in. Japanese island groups, See for lake in Germany.However, two exceptions were made. In cases in which the place became infamousbecause of the actions of the conquering power, that name is preferred-for exampleAuschwitz would be used rather than the Polish name of Oswiecim.

Also, in largerinternational cities, such as Roma, Koln and Wien, the anglicized name is used.



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